Redefining Access to Medicines

As part of its annual ISNTD d³ conference on drug discovery, development and diagnostics for tropical diseases, the International Society for Neglected Tropical Diseases (ISNTD) hosts a panel discussion and focus session on how to improve access to medicines for the world's poorest, exploring issues such as innovative funding mechanisms and patient & community networks to accelerate access to medicines and diagnostics.

Find out more from seven presentations and a panel discussion; the panelists are:

  • Chair: Andrew Jack (Financial Times)

  • Beatrice Greco (Merck Global Health Institute)

  • Jeffrey Moe (Duke Global Health Institute)

  • Eric Stobbaerts (DNDi)

  • Goylette Chami (University of Cambridge, Department of Pathology)

  • Danny Edwards (Access to Medicines Foundation)

  • Poppy Lamberton (University of Glasgow)

  • Margaret Olele (American Business Council)

ISNTD panel discussion: Redefining Access to Medicines

How can we improve access to medicines for the world's most vulnerable or remote patients? How can sustainable funding be secured to ensure that global healthcare needs are met, including for the world's poorest patients? How can public-private partnerships accelerate access to medicines? 

Jeffrey Moe (Duke Global Health Institute)

Access and the Priority Review Voucher

Poppy Lamberton (University of Glasgow)

Low praziquantel coverage: systematic non-compliance or systematically not offered?

Dr. Beatrice Greco (Merck Global Health Institute)

The Pediatric Praziquantel Program Case Study 

Margaret Olele (American Business Council)

The Labyrinth of Access to Healthcare in LMICs

Eric Stobbaerts (DNDi)

Scaling up Access to Care for Chagas Disease

Danny Edwards (Access to Medicine Foundation)

Considerations for sustainable access

Goylette Chami (University of Cambridge)

Community Drug Distribution & Access to Medicines

The International Society for Neglected Tropical Diseases

Progress through partnership for diseases of poverty

© 2019 International Society for Neglected Tropical Diseases